• Gesture here, Gesture there, but don’t Gesture everywhere….

    Gestures have always been facinating to me inside and out of the animation industry. I remember the lightbulb going on in my head when I first heard Glen Keane talk about how he looked at gestures. Never before did I put two and two together in the way he did. Now, with the advent of so many classes, online schools the info is out there. I recently did a class on Lynda.com. Its part of a series of classes where I will cover the craft more than software specific tools. Many of the learnings are free. Here are a bunch of clips for your viewing pleasure. Thank you all for still reading Spline Doctors. Please suggest things for the future and I will try to get them up. I heard people are interested in a Finding Dory Round Table.

    Welcome Video

    Cliche Gestures

    Over Gesticulation

    Weight and Physics

     

    6 Comments |
  • ALIENS !

    On this day – July 18, 1986 – ALIENS was released into U.S. theaters. This eagerly anticipated follow up to the original ALIEN film from 1979 not only delivered great entertainment, but ended up raising the bar on what a sequel could be. If you have not seen this, borrow it, rent it, watch it any way you can ! After, you can then read this great post from ScriptShadow pointing out 10 reasons why this movie works so well from a storytelling point of view. This is a great breakdown. Enjoy the read.

    - N. Stanton

    http://scriptshadow.blogspot.com/2011/05/temporary-aliens-re-post.html

    1 Comment |
  • Story and Character

    I had the great pleasure of doing a little documentary/teaching video with Nate Stanton and Lynda.com

    For the piece we came up with a simple concept so we could take it through and develop it a bit. This is

    obviously not a film we are working on, but more of an idea to look at the process we might go through.

    Check it out. Its a free Doc on Lynda.com.

     

    3 Comments |
  • Where do you fit in?

    A while back I did a post on stock rigs. After seeing many reels lately, I have to say something about that very topic. Something I found inspiring from a recent talk I heard was the presenter talking about how he felt about where students should fall when creating a reel or film for that matter. What was said was this:

    “We encourage the students to have work that is not¬† too artsy nor too much on the industry bias.”

    This is not the exact thing that was said but the gist of it is. That brings the question for students making a demo reel. What is the good balance between art and putting work on your reel that is good for potential employers to see? I think it really depends on the stage you are at. For example, a 3rd year student looking for an internship might put too much work on a reel in order to submit for an internship. If your graduating it makes sense to show a range of work but to express your artistic ideas. I personally love seeing a different take on something. I remember a reel that came in by Carlo Vogel where he animated an entire film with clothes. I thought, what an amazing idea. He had me from the beginning. When I see the reel that has yet another human rig doing a a line of dialogue from a popular film, I feel like some schools may as well be teaching plumbing or electronics. Where is the character? Where is the spark? What is interesting about it? Then there are school where I think, does anyone here really understand how to animate? Too much art, no principles, no design…

     

    Here are a few principles for demo reels

    1) Hook your viewer – Really open your reel with something interesting and that you feel is one of your strongest pieces.

    2) Quality not quantity - You don’t need every single thing on your reel to prove you can animate. Just put the best pieces.

    3) Be original – Please avoid stock rigs…Unless you alter them… The industry knows each one and seeing one tells the viewer, I am vanilla and have no original ideas beyond this gray rig on a grid.

    4) End strong – Leave the viewer with a good taste in their mouth.

    5) Show you have good ideas… - Its not about Polish, Its about good ideas and strong acting for character animation. And Story! Story for all the things you do… Can you tell a good story?

    6) Be your harshest critic. - This is the hardest. Its really hard to know where your at. Have someone good tell you where you are at. Its better to know the truth than to think your work is a 9 when its a 3.

    A few tips to keep you going and hopefully help!

    Andrew

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  • Zootopia sets the bar for 2016.

    Its been a while since I went to an animated film feeling like I needed to get back to my desk and animate harder! After seeing what our brothers and sisters down at Disney Feature Animation are doing, this was my feeling. Whats even better was keeping an eye on my kids and hearing them talk about it. Two kid thumbs up. I think the movie is great and as an animator I really just love the work and was amazed at how wonderful the animation was.  Appeal is off the charts and the acting is fun. If your an animator, or someone who just loves a fun film, go see it. Way to go ! Amazing work.

    Andrew

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